Walt Murphy is one of the finest track geeks that I know. Walt does #ThisDayinTrack&FieldHistory, an excellent daily service that provides true geek stories about our sport. You can check out the service for FREE with a free one-month trial subscription! (email: WaltMurphy44@gmail.com ) for the entire daily service. We will post a few historic moments each day, beginning February 1, 2024.

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This Day in Track & Field–May 8

By Walt Murphy’s News and Results Service (wmurphy25@aol.com), used with permission.     

1909—American Albert Raines won the Bronx Marathon in 2:46:04.6, which was faster than the listed World Record, but Great Britain’s Henry Barrett ran 2:42:31.0 earlier in the day in London. (Some sources list the date for Barrett’s race as May 26, but evidence suggests it actually took place on May 8.)

World Record Progressionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marathon_world_record_progression

A look back(with a picture of the trophy Raines won/might require subscription).

https://www.dailycamera.com/2011/02/21/boulder-restaurateurs-ancestor-left-brief-mysterious-mark-on-the-marathon/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Raines

1937—USC teammates Earle Meadows and Bill Sefton rode their bamboo poles to a height of 14-8  ½ (4.48) at the USC-Stanford dual meet at Stanford to break Sefton’s American Record of 14-7  3/8 (4.45). The marks were never recognized as a World Record, but the “Heavenly Twins” took care of that later in the month (May 29) when they both cleared 14-11 (4.54).

            Meadows, the 1936 Olympic Champion, was inducted into the National Hall of Fame in 1996.

Hall of Fame Biohttps://www.usatf.org/athlete-bios/earle-meadows

 

1954—Future two-time Olympic gold medalist and Hall-of-Famer Parry O’Brien (USC), using his innovative “O’Brien Glide,” broke the 60-foot barrier in the Shot Put with his winning toss of 60-5  ¼ (18.42) in the USC-UCLA dual meet in L.A.

WR Progressionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men’s_shot_put_world_record_progression

1965–This proved to be a good date for barrier-breaking as Texas A&M freshman Randy Matson, who had just turned 20 in March, became the first 70-footer in the Shot Put. Another future Hall-of-Famer (and 1968 Olympic gold medalist), Matson got his big toss of 70-7  ¼ (21.52)  in the opening round at the Southwest Conference Championships on his home field in College Station, Texas.

WR Progressionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men’s_shot_put_world_record_progression

1965–Three World (and Collegiate) Relay Records were set at the West Coast Relays in Fresno, California. Stanford ran 39.7 in the 440y, Oklahoma State 7:18.4 in the 2-mile, and UCLA 9:34.0 in the Distance Medley.

            In addition, collegiate freshmen records were set by Washington State’s Gerry Lindgren in the 2-mile (8:40.2), and Mt.SAC’s Bob Seagren in the Pole Vault (16-1/4 [4.995?]).

440y:Eric Frische, Dale Rubin, Robert McIntyre, Larry Questad

2-Mile: Jim Metcalfe-1:50.6, John Perry-1:47.5, Tom von Ruden-1:49.3, Dave Perry-1:51.0

DMR(y-WB): Dennis Breckow-1:49.5, Bob Frey-47.8, Arnd Kruger/GER-2:58.3, Bob Day-3:58.4

1971—18-year-old Beth Bonner (a month shy of turning 19) set a World Record of 3:01:42 at the AAU Eastern Regional Marathon in Philadelphia’s Fairmont Park. She would become the first female winner of the NY City Marathon 4 months later.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marathon_world_record_progression

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beth_Bonner

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